BRITISH CAVALRY STANDARDS

LATE SEVENTEENTH-EARLY EIGHTEENTH CENTURIES
 

Notes

In 1700, the cavalry of the British Army consisted of regiments and troops of horse and dragoons. The regiments of horse constituted the regular line cavalry, while dragoons were still regarded as mounted infantry. The army as a whole was divided into the English, Scottish and Irish establishments; thus the 1st, 2nd and 3rd Troops of Horse Guards were on the English establishment, and the 4th Troop was on the Scottish establishment. Independent troops of horse and dragoons still existed, but by 1700 the regimental organization was more common. Most cavalry regiments consisted of two troops, for a total strength of about 550 officers and men. The demands of war and peace resulted in numerous raisings and disbandments of troops and regiments between 1688, when William III came to the throne, and 1701, when the War of the Spanish Succession broke out.

Each troop of horse carried a cornet, made of silk with silk fringe, three feet square, with painted devices. Troops of dragoons carried a tailed guidon about five teen in length. The cornets and guidons depicted below date from the mid-1690s, but those used during Queen Anne's reign were similar.
 

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HIS MAJESTY'S HORSE GUARDS
1st Troop    2nd Troop    3rd Troop   4th (Scottish) Troop
 

                   

ROYAL REGIMENT OF HORSE
1st Troop    2nd Troop    3rd Troop
 

                   

THE QUEEN DOWAGER'S TROOP OF HORSE    PRINCESS ANNE OF DENMARK'S TROOP OF HORSE
 

THE EARL OF SHREWSBURY'S TROOP OF HORSE
 

                   

ROYAL REGIMENT OF DRAGOONS    HAY'S REGIMENT OF DRAGOONS
 

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