FLAGS OF THE UNITED KINGDOM
 


 
HISTORY AT THE HOIST  •  PAGE TWO
 

DEPENDENCIES OF THE CROWN  •  REGIONAL & MUNICIPAL FLAGS



 

DEPENDENCIES OF THE CROWN  •  THE CHANNEL ISLANDS

 

BAILIWICK OF GUERNSEY  •  CIVIL & GOVERNMENT FLAG

 

BAILIWICK OF GUERNSEY  •  CIVIL ENSIGN

 

BAILIWICK OF GUERNSEY  •  GOVERNMENT ENSIGN

 

BAILIWICK OF GUERNSEY  • LIEUTENANT-GOVERNOR'S FLAG

 

BAILIWICK OF JERSEY  •  CIVIL & GOVERNMENT FLAG

 

BAILIWICK OF JERSEY  •  CIVIL ENSIGN

 

BAILIWICK OF JERSEY  •  GOVERNMENT ENSIGN

 

BAILIWICK OF JERSEY  • LIEUTENANT-GOVERNOR'S FLAG

The Channel Islands (Guernsey, Jersey and their dependencies) are not part of the United Kingdom. Rather they are Crown Dependencies with internal self-government, the UK being responsible for foreign affairs and defense only. The Channel Islands were formerly part of the Duchy of Normandy, a fact symbolized by their coats of arms: those of England which in turn were derived for those of Normandy. The arms of Guernsey display a small sprig of leaves; those of Jersey incorporate a Plantagenet crown, recalling the Norman dukes who were Kings of England. Traditionally the flag of Guernsey was the English Cross of St. George and that of Jersey a flag similar to the Irish Cross of St. Patrick. These were felt to be insufficiently distinctive and so a Norman Cross was added to the flag of Guernsey (1986) and the arms of Jersey to its flag (1981). Their civil and state ensigns are British red and blue ensigns. The Sovereign is represented in Guernsey and Jersey by a lieutenant-governor whose flag is of the standard pattern for governors of overseas territories.

 

DEPENDENCIES OF THE CROWN  •  THE ISLE OF MAN

 

CIVIL & GOVERNMENT FLAG

 

CIVIL ENSIGN

 

LIEUTENANT-GOVERNOR'S FLAG

 

FLAG OF THE TYNWALD

Like the Channel Islands, the Isle of Man is a self-governing Crown Dependency. The arms of Man incorporate a most distinctive heraldic device, the triskelion: three armored legs with golden spurs on a field of red. This device is of ancient date but how it came to be the Manx badge is unknown. The Manx flag is a banner of the arms and the civil ensign is a British Red Ensign with the triskelion in the fly. No state ensign is authorized so presumably the UK state ensign with horizontal anchor is used. The lieutenant-governor’s flag is of the standard pattern. There is also a flag for the Tynwald (legislature): blue with a Norse longboat in gold, commemorating the ancient Kingdom of Mann and the Isles. The Union Jack may be flown in the Crown Dependencies but when it is their flags take precedence.

 

REGIONAL FLAGS

 

CITY OF LONDON

 

CORNWALL

 

DORSET

 

EAST RIDING OF YORKSHIRE

 

HEREFORDSHIRE

 

GLAMAGORN (WALES)

 

ORKNEY ISLANDS

 

SHETLAND ISLANDS

Despite many changes over the centuries, often related to local government reforms, the historical counties of the UK still exist. The areas in which lords-lieutenant are appointed are called lieutenancies or ceremonial counties and they do not necessarily correspond to administrative divisions. English and Welsh counties have adopted flags, often based on traditional county coats of arms. Most counties in Scotland and Northern Ireland do not have official flags, though the former's Orkney and Shetland Islands have adopted flags of the Scandinavian Cross pattern, recalling their former status as part of the ancient Norse Kingdom of Mann and the Isles.




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