UNITED MEXICAN STATES

 

CURRENT NAVAL ENSIGNS & FLAGS
 

 

NATIONAL FLAG & NAVAL ENSIGN

 

NAVAL JACK

 

COMMISSIONING PENNANT

 

APPOINTMENT & RANK FLAGS

 

SECRETARY OF THE NAVY

 

UNDERSECRETARY OF THE NAVY

 

CHIEF CLERK OF THE NAVY

 

CHIEF OF THE NAVAL STAFF

 

ADMIRAL COMMANDING

 

VICE-ADMIRAL COMMANDING

 

REAR-ADMIRAL COMMANDING

 

ADMIRAL NOT IN COMMAND

 

VICE-ADMIRAL NOT IN COMMAND

 

REAR-ADMIRAL NOT IN COMMAND

 

COMMAND PENNANTS

 

CAPTAIN COMMANDING

 

COMMANDER COMMANMDING

 

LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER COMMANDING

 

SENIOR OFFICER


The current naval flags of Mexico were adopted in 2000 and for the most part are different only in their proportions from those they replaced: The latter were slightly rectangular while the current ones are square. The national flag serves as the. Mexico follows the practice of many other nations by employing as its naval jack an historical flag: that of the Army of the Three Guarantees, which secured Mexican independence in 1821. An anchor was added to this flag to signify its new status. Position and rank flags are mostly based on the national flag, with the badge of the Navy--the Mexican eagle standing on crossed anchors, in place of the national coat of arms. The forked rank flags for admirals not in command are also used afloat by general officers of the Mexican Marine Corps.

In recent years the Mexican Navy has been modernized, commissioning several new classes of offshore patrol  and coastal patrol vessels. The largest and most capable warships are four former US Navy frigates of the Knox class. These will be replaced over the next few years by eight Sigma-class patrol frigates of Dutch design, the first of which is due to enter service in 2020. The Mexican Navy's primary missions are drug interdiction, fishery protection, search and rescue and disaster response, and most of its ships are optimized for these roles. There is also a small amphibious warfare squadron.
 



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