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KINGDOM OF DENMARK-NORWAY

3rd JUTLAND INFANTRY REGIMENT  •  DANISH AUXILIARY CORPS  •  1813

The Kingdom of Denmark-Norway had done its best to steer clear of the wars of Napoleon and though not entirely successful in that regard had at least limited its involvement. The result was that by 1813 the Danish Army was in good fighting trim: well armed and equipped, well drilled, and well officered. Unlike other armies whose depleted ranks had been filled with raw recruits, most Danish soldiers had been serving with the colors for three or four years. Thus the Danish Auxiliary Corps that took the field in 1813 was of superior quality.

In 1813 Denmark stood in alliance with France and the Emperor demanded a Danish corps for northern Germany so as to free French troops for service elsewhere. Behind the scenes, however, the Danish king, Frederick VI, was attempting to conclude an alliance with the ascendant Allies. What he got instead was an Anglo-Swedish ultimatum demanding that Denmark renounce her alliance with France, give up Norway and place her army under Swedish command. This was too much for Frederick, who decided that Denmark had no choice but to stick by France. Accordingly a so-called Auxiliary Corps was made available for service in north Germany; it became part of the French Army's XXIII Corps, commanded by Marshal Davout. The commander of the Danish troops was the King's brother-in-law, Prince Frederick of Hessen.

Danish line infantry regiments of the period had three or four battalions, each of which received a king's color—a square version of the Danish national flag or Dannebrog—and a regimental color. The former bore the crowned royal cypher in each corner; the latter has a small canton of the Dannebrog, a field of the regimental facing color, royal cyphers in three corners and "flames" in a contrasting color. In the center was the regimental badge: the crowned arms of the province from which the regiment took its name. The colors were about six feet square, made of silk, with the insignia painted on.

MISSION ACCOMPLISHED
GUIDON  •  511th MILITARY POLICE COMPANY

The 511th Military Police Company traces its lineage to the 1125th Military Police Company, which was constituted 12 November 1942 in the Army of the United States and activated on 1 January 1943 at Brookley Field, Alabama. After World War II service in the Pacific theater, the company was inactivated on 25 March 1946 in Japan. On  1 November 1970, the 1125th was redesignated  as the 511th Military Police Company, allotted to the Regular Army and activated at Fort Dix, New Jersey. The 511th is currently stationed at Fort Drum, New York, as a unit of the 10th Sustainment Brigade, 10th Mountain Division.

The 511th Military Police Company's campaign credits include Leyte (Philippines—World War II), Panama (1989) and Iraq (2006 and 2008-09). The 511th received the Republic of the Philippines Presidential Unit Citation for its service on Leyte and the Meritorious Unit Commendation for its service in Iraq in 2006.

The 511th's guidon is of the standard pattern for separate TO&E companies, with the Military Police branch insignia over the unit's numerical designation in the Military Police branch colors.

The soldiers of the 511th Military Police Company (including the daughter of the author of this site) deployed to Afghanistan on 11 September 2010 and returned to their home station on September 5, 2011. Their guidon will remain on display here in honor of the 511th's exceptional service during its Afghanistan deployment.

See also US Army Guidons of the Combat Arms.

SUPPLYING THE ATOMIC ARMY

ORGANIZATIONAL FLAG  •  US ARMY 3rd MISSILE COMMAND SUPPLY GROUP  •  1962

In the late 1950s US Army combat doctrine was focused on the challenges of the atomic battlefield. One result of this was the development of the Pentomic division organization and another was the creation of the US Army Missile Command. This command was responsible for the new atomic-capable rocket and missile units that were then being organized. Some of these went to the combat divisions but others were grouped together under numbered missile commands. Three types of missile command were planned but only two types were actually organized: medium with two Honest John rocket battalions and one Corporal missile battalion, and light with one or two Honest John rocket battalions only. The numbered commands also has a headquarters battery, a mechanized infantry battalion for defense and security, a combat engineer battalion, an ordnance battalion and a supply group. The medium commands were intended to augment the firepower of corps and theater armies while the light air-deployable commands were intended to augment the firepower of divisions, especially airborne divisions.

The 3rd Missile Command was activated at Fort Bragg, North Carolina in 1957, initially with one Honest John rocket battalion. The Command's organizational flag was blue, fringed yellow, with the authorized shoulder sleeve insignia (SSI) centered. Most of its various subordinate units had branch-oriented organizational colors and guidons but the organizational flag specified for the Supply Group had a field, number and monogram in the Artillery branch colors: scarlet and yellow. The flag was made of silk, 3 feet at the hoist by four feet on the fly plus 2 1/2-inch yellow fringe.

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TOM GREGG

WAR FLAGS features selections from my extensive collection of GIF images. I also invite you to visit Twenty-Six Letters, my blog devoted to politics, current affairs and culture. I enjoy hearing from people who share my interest in flags of all kinds. Comments and questions about the images on these pages, as well as information about military and naval flags, past and present, are always welcome.

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15 February 2016
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