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The links below provide quick access to the main sections of the site and to the index page of HISTORICAL FLAGS OF THE WORLD, a special section devoted to flags that have played a significant role in history. To navigate around the site, simply click on the flag icons. Discover flag-related military history by clicking on the "Parading the Colors" link. Thanks for stopping by—and enjoy your visit!
 

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KINGDOM OF PRUSSIA

 

ROYAL PRUSSIAN ARMY  •  SILESIAN GRENADIER BATTALION  •  1814-15
 

After its disastrous defeat at the hands of Napoleon in 1806, the Prussian Army was gradually rebuilt under the guidance of a group of military reformers led by Gerhard von Scharnhorst and August Graf von Gneisenau. As Prussia had been reduced to the status of a Napoleonic satellite state with the size of its army severely limited by treaty, much of the early work of reform had to be done covertly. But by 1813 the groundwork had been laid for the national mobilization of that year, which brought a new model Prussian Army into the field against Napoleon.

Most of the colors of the infantry regiments of 1806 had been lost or destroyed. The new ones that began to be issued in 1808 were similar to the old ones but had a new style of eagle and different corner monograms (FW for King Frederick William III). As before, each regiment had two types of color: an Avancierfahne and a Retirierfahne. The infantry regiments were formed with two musketeer (line infantry) battalions and a fusilier (light infantry) battalion. By regulation the first musketeer battalion carried an Avancierfahne and a Retirierfahne while the second musketeer battalion carried two Retirierfahnen. Fusilier battalions received no colors. 

Prior to 1808 infantry regiments had also contained two grenadier companies but in that year they were removed and formed into independent battalions, each four companies strong. At first these grenadier battalions carried no colors but when the regulations were amended to stipulate that musketeer battalions should carry only one color each, the surplus Retirierfahnen were passed to the grenadiers. Usually the Retirierfahne of the senior regiment from which the grenadier companies were drawn was carried. The Silesian Grenadier Battalion, however, whose companies came from the 10th (1st Silesian) and 11th (2nd Silesian) regiments, carried the Retirierfahne of the latter.

See also Kingdom of Prussia, Colors of Infantry Regiments 1740-1806.
 

 

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GUIDON  •  511th MILITARY POLICE COMPANY
 

The 511th Military Police Company traces its lineage to the 1125th Military Police Company, which was constituted 12 November 1942 in the Army of the United States and activated on 1 January 1943 at Brookley Field, Alabama. After World War II service in the Pacific theater, the company was inactivated on 25 March 1946 in Japan. On  1 November 1970, the 1125th was redesignated  as the 511th Military Police Company, allotted to the Regular Army and activated at Fort Dix, New Jersey. The 511th is currently stationed at Fort Drum, New York, as a unit of the 10th Sustainment Brigade, 10th Mountain Division.

The 511th Military Police Company's campaign credits include Leyte (Philippines—World War II), Panama (1989) and Iraq (2006 and 2008-09). The 511th received the Republic of the Philippines Presidential Unit Citation for its service on Leyte and the Meritorious Unit Commendation for its service in Iraq in 2006.

The 511th's guidon is of the standard pattern for separate TO&E companies, with the Military Police branch insignia over the unit's numerical designation in the Military Police branch colors.

The soldiers of the 511th Military Police Company (including the daughter of the author of this site) deployed to Afghanistan on 11 September 2010 and returned to their home station on September 5, 2011. Their guidon will remain on display here in honor of the 511th's exceptional service during its Afghanistan deployment.

See also US Army Guidons of the Combat Arms.
 


 


 

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ENSIGN OF THE US REVENUE CUTTER SERVICE  •  1799
 

The ancestor of today's United States Coast Guard was the United States Revenue Cutter Service. It was established in 1790, three years after the adoption of the Constitution, by Secretary of the Treasury Alexander Hamilton. Until the re-establishment of the Navy in 1798, the Revenue Cutter Service was the sole naval force at the disposal of the nation. Its primary missions were to combat smuggling and piracy, though from the beginning it also undertook to assist mariners in distress. Between 1799 and 1910 US revenue cutters flew a distinctive ensign in lieu of the National Ensign: sixteen vertical stripes, red and white, with a white canton bearing the national coat of arms in dark blue. (The jack for revenue cutters was the canton of the ensign.) The sixteen stripes represented the sixteen states that existed at the time of the ensign's adoption. Over the years the were several versions of the revenue ensign, all with sixteen stripes but displaying various artistic renditions of the coat of arms. On land it served as the US revenue flag, being flown over the customs houses that served major ports.

In 1910 President William Howard Taft signed an executive order creating a distinctive ensign for the Revenue Cutter Service: the revenue ensign with the badge of the service in the fly. Henceforward revenue cutters were to fly this ensign as a special distinction along with the National Ensign and Union Jack. When the Coast Guard was established in 1915 the ensign was modified to display the badge of the new service and as such it has continued in service to this day.

 See also US Coast Guard Main Page.
 

 

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WAR FLAGS features selections from my extensive collection of GIF images. I also invite you to visit Twenty-Six Letters, my blog devoted to politics, current affairs and culture.

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7 February 1999

10 March 2015

25 April 2015

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