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STANDARD OF THE 1st BATTALION, TRAIN OF ARTILLERY  •  1804-12

Napoleon created the Train of Artillery in 1800 to replace the civilian contractors who had previously been responsible for the transport and supply of ammunition on campaign. The Emperor, as he became in 1804, believed that a military organization would be more reliable and efficient in the discharge of such an important task. The soldiers of the train were mostly former cavalrymen who had been wounded or were otherwise unfit for continued service in that branch. Their uniform was steel gray with dark blue facings; train drivers were armed with a saber, carbine and pistol. Ammunition was transported in several types of purpose-built wagons or caissons. The 12-pounder caisson, for example, carried 48 rounds of shot and 20 rounds of canister for 12-pounder guns, 62 rounds of shot and 30 rounds of canister for 8-pounder guns, and 14,000 infantry musket cartridges. The artillery ammunition was "fixed," i.e. projectile and propellant made up as one round. A train battalion consisted of an elite company and four line companies. The former supplied the horse artillery; the latter supplied the foot artillery and the infantry. As a rule one train company supported one artillery company of six guns and two howitzers, so that a train battalion could support 40 guns and howitzers in total.

As a mounted corps the Train of Artillery received in 1804 tailed standards similar to those of the horse artillery. At that time there were ten train battalions.
 

MISSION ACCOMPLISHED
GUIDON  •  511th MILITARY POLICE COMPANY

The 511th Military Police Company traces its lineage to the 1125th Military Police Company, which was constituted 12 November 1942 in the Army of the United States and activated on 1 January 1943 at Brookley Field, Alabama. After World War II service in the Pacific theater, the company was inactivated on 25 March 1946 in Japan. On  1 November 1970, the 1125th was redesignated  as the 511th Military Police Company, allotted to the Regular Army and activated at Fort Dix, New Jersey. The 511th is currently stationed at Fort Drum, New York, as a unit of the 10th Sustainment Brigade, 10th Mountain Division.

The 511th Military Police Company's campaign credits include Leyte (Philippines—World War II), Panama (1989) and Iraq (2006 and 2008-09). The 511th received the Republic of the Philippines Presidential Unit Citation for its service on Leyte and the Meritorious Unit Commendation for its service in Iraq in 2006.

The 511th's guidon is of the standard pattern for separate TO&E companies, with the Military Police branch insignia over the unit's numerical designation in the Military Police branch colors.

The soldiers of the 511th Military Police Company (including the daughter of the author of this site) deployed to Afghanistan on 11 September 2010 and returned to their home station on September 5, 2011. Their guidon will remain on display here in honor of the 511th's exceptional service during its Afghanistan deployment.

See also US Army Guidons of the Combat Arms.

COMMANDER-IN-CHIEF

FLAG OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES  •  1916-45

Up to 1916 there was no single presidential flag and color, the Army and Navy each having its own version. To remedy this situation President Woodrow Wilson approved a unified design. The field was national flag blue and the presidential version of the national coat of arms was primarily white. Like other departmental flags of the executive branch a star was placed in each corner. One anomalous feature of the design was that the eagle, contrary to heraldic practice, faced to the viewer's right. The version shown above, without fringe, was primarily used afloat; a fringed color was provided for ceremonial and indoor use. The 1916-45 flag was replaced by the current presidential flag in 1945.

YOUR HOST

                         

TOM GREGG

WAR FLAGS features selections from my extensive collection of GIF images. I also invite you to visit Twenty-Six Letters, my blog devoted to politics, current affairs and culture. I enjoy hearing from people who share my interest in flags of all kinds. Comments and questions about the images on these pages, as well as information about military and naval flags, past and present, are always welcome.

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SITE ESTABLISHED LAST UPDATE NEXT UPDATE
7 February 1999

26 August 2016

30 September 2016
WAR FLAGS © 1999-2016 Thomas M. Gregg