Through the Ages & Around the World

 

FIFTEENTH ANNIVERSARY  •  1999-2014

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The links below provide quick access to the main sections of the site and to the index page of HISTORICAL FLAGS OF THE WORLD, a special section devoted to flags that have played a significant role in history. To navigate around the site, simply click on the flag icons. Discover flag-related military history by clicking on the "Parading the Colors" link. Thanks for stopping by—and enjoy your visit!
 

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KINGDOM OF FRANCE

 

MAISON MILITAIRE DU ROI DE FRANCE  •  GENDARMES DE LA GARDE  •  EIGHTEENTH CENTURY
 

 The royal guard of the French kings (troops of the royal household or Maison militaire du roi de France) consisted of several units of horse and foot with exclusive terms of service, higher pay and special perquisites that set them apart from the rest of the French Army. Among these privileged units was the Gendarmes de la Garde, a cavalry company created in 1609 by King Henry IV for his son Louis, the Dauphin de France. When the latter became King Louis XIII he incorporated this company into the Maison militaire as the Gendarmes de la Garde. In the eighteenth century it was formed as a squadron with a total strength of 210 officers and troopers divided into a staff and four companies, one of which was always charged with the guard of the King’s person. During the first half of the Seven Years War the Gendarmes de la Garde saw no active service, being stationed at Versailles. Later the squadron served in Germany, albeit seeing little action. In 1787, in an attempt to reduce the expenses of the royal household, the Gendarmes de la Garde and several other units of the Maison militaire were disbanded.

The officers and troopers of the Gendarmes de la Garde were splendidly uniformed in scarlet coats heavily trimmed with gold braid. Headdress was a black tricorn hat bound with gold braid, ornamented with a white cockade and a white plume. The troopers were armed with a straight sword, a pair of pistols and a rifled carbine. In battle all ranks wore a blackened steel breastplate over their coats. The squadron standards—one per company—were equally ornate. The white field was heavily embroidered in gold, with trophies of arms in the corners and an allegorical scene in a central frame depicting thunderbolts issuing from a thundercloud. The scene alluded to the squadron’s Latin motto, which translates to “The Wrath of Angry Jupiter.” These standards were made of embroidered silk, were slightly rectangular and measured about one meter at the hoist, not including the gold and silver fringe. When not in use, the standards of the Gendarmes de la Garde were kept in the King’s apartments.

See also The King’s Cavalry (Eighteenth Century).
 

 

MISSION ACCOMPLISHED
 

 
GUIDON  •  511th MILITARY POLICE COMPANY
 

The 511th Military Police Company traces its lineage to the 1125th Military Police Company, which was constituted 12 November 1942 in the Army of the United States and activated on 1 January 1943 at Brookley Field, Alabama. After World War II service in the Pacific theater, the company was inactivated on 25 March 1946 in Japan. On  1 November 1970, the 1125th was redesignated  as the 511th Military Police Company, allotted to the Regular Army and activated at Fort Dix, New Jersey. The 511th is currently stationed at Fort Drum, New York, as a unit of the 10th Sustainment Brigade, 10th Mountain Division.

The 511th Military Police Company's campaign credits include Leyte (Philippines—World War II), Panama (1989) and Iraq (2006 and 2008-09). The 511th received the Republic of the Philippines Presidential Unit Citation for its service on Leyte and the Meritorious Unit Commendation for its service in Iraq in 2006.

The 511th's guidon is of the standard pattern for separate TO&E companies, with the Military Police branch insignia over the unit's numerical designation in the Military Police branch colors.

The soldiers of the 511th Military Police Company (including the daughter of the author of this site) deployed to Afghanistan on 11 September 2010 and returned to their home station on September 5, 2011. Their guidon will remain on display here in honor of the 511th's exceptional service during its Afghanistan deployment.

See also US Army Guidons of the Combat Arms.
 


 


 

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BLACKHORSE REGIMENT

 

ORGANIZATIONAL COLOR
1st SQUADRON, 11TH ARMORED CAVALRY REGIMENT  •  US ARMY
 

The 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment, currently stationed at Fort Irwin, California, was born in 1901 when it was constituted in the Regular Army as the 11th Cavalry Regiment. The regiment saw combat during World War II (European Theater), in Vietnam and  most recently in Iraq. During the Cold War it served  for many years in West Germany as a unit of US V Corps. Today the Blackhorse Regiment (the nickname derives from the crest of the regimental coat of arms) is organized under the UEx system with two combined arms squadrons, an armored reconnaissance squadron, a field artillery battalion and a regimental support squadron. Though cavalry titles are used, the actual organization is identical to a UEx heavy brigade combat team. The reconnaissance squadron and the FA battalion are roundout units from the Nevada Army National Guard and the California Army National Guard respectively. In peacetime, the 1st Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry is tasked to serve as the OPFOR (opposing forces) unit at the National Training Center, Fort Irwin. Its unit designation in this role is "60th Motorized Rifle Division."

All regiments and battalions/squadrons of the US Army are issued a National Color and an Organizational Color. For cavalry regiments of the US Army the Organizational Color has a yellow field and fringe, this being the cavalry branch color. Squadrons have a color identical to that of the parent regiment with the squadron number in the upper fly. National Colors and Organizational Colors are made of heavyweight rayon banner cloth; dimensions are 3 feet on the hoist by 4 feet on the fly plus 2 1/2-inch fringe (always yellow for the National Color). If authorized, unit decorations and campaign streamers are always attached to the staff of the Organizational Color.
 

 

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TOM GREGG
 


 

WAR FLAGS features selections from my extensive collection of GIF images. I also invite you to visit Twenty-Six Letters, my blog devoted to politics, current affairs and culture.

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SITE ESTABLISHED LAST UPDATE NEXT UPDATE
7 February 1999

11 April 2014

30 May 2014

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