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EMPIRE OF THE FRENCH

FANION DE BATAILLON  •  4th BATTALION, 8TH REGIMENT OF LINE INFANTRY  • 1809

Napoleon's order of 1909 specified that each line and light infantry regiment would have only one Eagle and drapeau (color), to be carried by the 1st Battalion. The remaining battalions were to be issued plain fanions de bataillon made of bunting: white for the 2nd Battalion, red for the 3rd, blue for the 4th, green for the 5th and yellow for the 6th. They were carried on a staff with a spearhead finial and were the same size as the drapeaux. Apparently not all regiments complied with this directive, however. Some failed to turn in their surplus drapeaux, others added  inscriptions and insignia to their fanions, and still others devised fanions unique to the regiment, though all these practices were specifically prohibited. The 8th Line Infantry's battalions had fanions of the basic pattern of the drapeaux, though without any ornamentation or dedication from the Emperor. The inscription was a simple unit designation. Perhaps to further distinguish them from the drapeaux, these fanions were carried on the staff with the upper red quarter at the hoist.

See also French Army Line & Light Infantry Colors, 1804-15.

MISSION ACCOMPLISHED
GUIDON  •  511th MILITARY POLICE COMPANY

The 511th Military Police Company traces its lineage to the 1125th Military Police Company, which was constituted 12 November 1942 in the Army of the United States and activated on 1 January 1943 at Brookley Field, Alabama. After World War II service in the Pacific theater, the company was inactivated on 25 March 1946 in Japan. On  1 November 1970, the 1125th was redesignated  as the 511th Military Police Company, allotted to the Regular Army and activated at Fort Dix, New Jersey. The 511th is currently stationed at Fort Drum, New York, as a unit of the 10th Sustainment Brigade, 10th Mountain Division.

The 511th Military Police Company's campaign credits include Leyte (Philippines—World War II), Panama (1989) and Iraq (2006 and 2008-09). The 511th received the Republic of the Philippines Presidential Unit Citation for its service on Leyte and the Meritorious Unit Commendation for its service in Iraq in 2006.

The 511th's guidon is of the standard pattern for separate TO&E companies, with the Military Police branch insignia over the unit's numerical designation in the Military Police branch colors.

The soldiers of the 511th Military Police Company (including the daughter of the author of this site) deployed to Afghanistan on 11 September 2010 and returned to their home station on September 5, 2011. Their guidon will remain on display here in honor of the 511th's exceptional service during its Afghanistan deployment.

See also US Army Guidons of the Combat Arms.

"ALWAYS READY"



UNITED STATES REVENUE MARINE & REVENUE CUTTER SERVICE  ENSIGN  •  1868-1910

Semper Paratus ("Always Ready") is the proud motto of America's oldest military branch with an unbroken record of service, the United States Coast Guard. The ancestor of the Coast Guard,  the United States Revenue Marine, was established in 1790 by Secretary of the Treasury Alexander Hamilton, and was renamed the Revenue Cutter Service in 1894. A distinctive ensign for ships of the Revenue Marine was introduced in 1799. There were sixteen states at that time, hence the  sixteen vertical stripes of red and white. Except for variations in the artistic rendition of the US coat of arms in the canton, the Revenue Ensign remained unchanged until 1910. In that year President William Howard Taft signed an executive order that modified the ensign by adding the emblem of the Revenue Cutter Service in the fly. From then on revenue cutters flew the National Ensign and the Union Jack, with the Revenue Ensign as their distinguishing flag. When the the Revenue Cutter Service was amalgamated with the United States Life-Saving Service and renamed the United States Coast Guard, the ensign was again modified to display the emblem of the new service. See also Ensigns and Flags of the United States Coast Guard.

YOUR HOST

                         

TOM GREGG

WAR FLAGS features selections from my extensive collection of GIF images. I also invite you to visit Twenty-Six Letters, my blog devoted to politics, current affairs and culture. I enjoy hearing from people who share my interest in flags of all kinds. Comments and questions about the images on these pages, as well as information about military and naval flags, past and present, are always welcome.

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7 February 1999

22 May 2017

25 June 2017
WAR FLAGS © 1999-2017 Thomas M. Gregg