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KINGDOM OF FRANCE

COLOR OF THE 1st REGIMENT OF INFANTRY OF THE LINE  •  1830-48

The Revolution of 1830 chased King Charles X from the throne of France, ending forever Bourbon rule. In his place was seated Louis-Phillipe, the Duc d'Orléans, a cousin of the late Louis XVI. The Orléanists had long been distrusted by the Bourbons, who saw in this cadet branch of the French royal family a rival for the crown. Nevertheless, when Charles X abdicated in favor of his ten-year-old grandson, he named Louis-Phillipe as regent. But the latter ignored this and maneuvered to have himself enthroned instead. The Chamber of Deputies, aware of Louis-Phillipe's liberal leanings, ultimately offered him the crown.

One of Louis-Phillipe's first acts as king was to abolish the white royal flag and restore the blue-white-red Tricolor as France's national flag. The Army's white regimental colors and standards were also replaced with Tricolors, fringed with gold, bearing a dedication form the King of the French (as Louis-Phillipe was styled) to the regiment on the obverse and the motto Honor and Country on the reverse. No further political changes in France displaced the Tricolor as national flag or military color.

MISSION ACCOMPLISHED
GUIDON  •  511th MILITARY POLICE COMPANY

The 511th Military Police Company traces its lineage to the 1125th Military Police Company, which was constituted 12 November 1942 in the Army of the United States and activated on 1 January 1943 at Brookley Field, Alabama. After World War II service in the Pacific theater, the company was inactivated on 25 March 1946 in Japan. On  1 November 1970, the 1125th was redesignated  as the 511th Military Police Company, allotted to the Regular Army and activated at Fort Dix, New Jersey. The 511th is currently stationed at Fort Drum, New York, as a unit of the 10th Sustainment Brigade, 10th Mountain Division.

The 511th Military Police Company's campaign credits include Leyte (Philippines—World War II), Panama (1989) and Iraq (2006 and 2008-09). The 511th received the Republic of the Philippines Presidential Unit Citation for its service on Leyte and the Meritorious Unit Commendation for its service in Iraq in 2006.

The 511th's guidon is of the standard pattern for separate TO&E companies, with the Military Police branch insignia over the unit's numerical designation in the Military Police branch colors.

The soldiers of the 511th Military Police Company (including the daughter of the author of this site) deployed to Afghanistan on 11 September 2010 and returned to their home station on September 5, 2011. Their guidon will remain on display here in honor of the 511th's exceptional service during its Afghanistan deployment.

See also US Army Guidons of the Combat Arms.

THE RED BULLS

ORGANIZATIONAL FLAG  •  34th INFANTRY DIVISION

The 34th Infantry Division was first activated in 1917, its subordinate units coming from the North Dakota, South Dakota, Iowa and Minnesota National Guard. Its shoulder sleeve insignia (SSI)was designed by Marvin Cone, an artist then serving in the division. Cone’s design superimposed a red bull’s head over a black olla (Mexican water jug), symbolizing the desert terrain of Camp Cody, New Mexico, where the 34th did its training. Only later however, during World War II, did the division acquire its nickname: “Red Bulls” The 34th arrived in France in October 1918, too late to be committed to action, and returned to the US for release from federal service in December 1918. Between the wars the 34th remained as a National Guard division and with war looming it was called into federal service on 10 February 1941. The 34th was one of the first US Army divisions to be sent to Europe, arriving in Belfast, Northern Ireland in January 1942. Subsequently it participated in the North African and Italian campaigns for a total of 517 days in combat, more than any other US Army division in the Mediterranean theater of operations. Casualties totaled 3,737 killed in action, 14,165 wounded in action and 3,460 missing in action. The total—21,362—was the highest recorded by any division in the Mediterranean theater. Soldiers of the Red Bull Division were awarded ten Medals of Honor, ninety-eight Distinguished Service Crosses, one Distinguished Service Medal, 1,153 Silver Stars, 116 Legion of Merit medals, one Distinguished Flying Cross, 2,545 Bronze Star Medals, fifty-four Soldier's Medals, eighty-six Air Medals and 15,000 Purple Hearts. The division as a whole received three Presidential Unit Citations. With victory in Europe the 34th returned to the US for release from federal service on 3 November 1945. 

After World War II the 34th remained as a division of the Army National Guard until 1968, when it was inactivated. In 1991, however, the Red Bulls returned to the Guard and since 2001 units and individual soldiers of the division have served on multiple deployments to Afganistan and Iraq. In 2006-07 the 34th was reorganized under the Army’s UEx scheme and today it exercise peacetime command and control and training oversight of four brigade combat teams (two armored, two infantry) a combat aviation brigade and a field artillery brigade (possibly reflagged by now as 34th Infantry Division Artillery).

Organizational flags for infantry divisions are horizontally divided, scarlet over national flag blue, with the division's shoulder sleeve insignia (SSI) in proper colors centered. Dimensions are 3 feet at the hoist by 4 feet on the fly with 2 1/2-inch yellow fringe. They are made of heavyweight rayon banner cloth with the insignia and numerals or monograms applied to appear properly on both sides of the flag. Campaign and unit decoration streamers awarded to divisions are always displayed with these flags.

YOUR HOST

                         

TOM GREGG

WAR FLAGS features selections from my extensive collection of GIF images. I also invite you to visit Twenty-Six Letters, my blog devoted to politics, current affairs and culture. I enjoy hearing from people who share my interest in flags of all kinds. Comments and questions about the images on these pages, as well as information about military and naval flags, past and present, are always welcome.

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SITE ESTABLISHED LAST UPDATE NEXT UPDATE
7 February 1999

7 November 2016

15 December 2016
WAR FLAGS © 1999-2016 Thomas M. Gregg