Through the Ages & Around the World  
 

1999-2019
TWENTIETH ANNIVERSARY UPDATE
 

 To navigate around the site, simply click on the flag icons. Be sure to check out:

PARADING THE COLORS: Flag art and images

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NEW! FLAGS THAT NEVER WERE: A look at the whimsical side of vexillology

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KINGDOM OF FRANCE

Régiment de Bourgogne •  Drapeau du Colonel & Drapeau d'Ordonnance

When WAR FLAGS was launched on 7 February 1999 as a single web page, the colors of the Regiment of Burgundy were the first flags to be featured. This regiment was raised in 1667 and it remained in service under its ancient name and colors until 1791 when the Minister of War ordered all regiments of the French Army to give up their royal titles and be known by their numbers instead. The Regiment of Burgundy thus became the 59th Regiment of Infantry of the Line. The old regimental colors were confiscated, later to be burned, and were replaced by new ones reflecting the Army's altered status.

Each regiment of the Royal French Army was granted a drapeau du colonel (colonel's color) and a number of drapeaux d'ordonnance  (company colors) The colors of the Regiment of Burgundy displayed the ragged cross, the old heraldic symbol of the Dukes of Burgundy, on a white field semé of gold fleurs de lys. On the colonel's color the cross was white; on company colors it was red. See also The Army of Louis XIV.

MISSION ACCOMPLISHED
GUIDON  •  511th MILITARY POLICE COMPANY

The 511th Military Police Company traces its lineage to the 1125th Military Police Company, which was constituted 12 November 1942 in the Army of the United States and activated on 1 January 1943 at Brookley Field, Alabama. After World War II service in the Pacific theater, the company was inactivated on 25 March 1946 in Japan. On  1 November 1970, the 1125th was redesignated  as the 511th Military Police Company, allotted to the Regular Army and activated at Fort Dix, New Jersey. The 511th is currently stationed at Fort Drum, New York, as a unit of the 10th Sustainment Brigade, 10th Mountain Division.

The 511th Military Police Company's campaign credits include Leyte (Philippines—World War II), Panama (1989) and Iraq (2006 and 2008-09). The 511th received the Republic of the Philippines Presidential Unit Citation for its service on Leyte and the Meritorious Unit Commendation for its service in Iraq in 2006.

The 511th's guidon is of the standard pattern for separate TO&E companies, with the Military Police branch insignia over the unit's numerical designation in the Military Police branch colors.

The soldiers of the 511th Military Police Company (including the daughter of the author of this site) deployed to Afghanistan on 11 September 2010 and returned to their home station on September 5, 2011. Their guidon will remain on display here in honor of the 511th's exceptional service during its Afghanistan deployment.

See also US Army Guidons of the Combat Arms.

THEY FIRED THE FIRST SHOT


SOUTH CAROLINA MILITARY ACADEMY  •  DISTINGUISHING FLAG OF THE CITADEL BATTERY •  1861-65

South Carolina seceded from the United States in December 1860. Shortly thereafter the state's military forces took control of all harbor defenses of Charleston with the exception of Fort Sumter, whose US Army garrison refused to surrender. One of the commandeered batteries was manned by the cadets of the South Carolina Military Institute—The Citadel. The flag hoisted over the Citadel Battery was red, charged with a white palmetto tree and crescent, these being symbols of South Carolina. The Citadel Battery is credited with firing the first shot of the Civil War. On 9 January the steamer Star of the West arrived at Charleston, having been chartered by the US government to resupply Fort Sumter. She was fired on by the Citadel Battery, suffering three hits but no serious damage. Nevertheless her master considered it too dangerous to proceed and the attempt to resupply the fort was abandoned. The Citadel Battery participated in the bombardment of Fort Sumter on April 12-13 1861 and went on to serve through the war as the Palmetto Battery, finally surrendering at Mobile, Alabama in April 1865. The flag of the Citadel Battery survived the war and today it is on display that the South Carolina Military Institute.

See also Confederate Army Flags & Colors
 

YOUR HOST

                         

TOM GREGG

WAR FLAGS features selections from my extensive collection of GIF images. I enjoy hearing from people who share my interest in flags of all kinds. Comments and questions about the images on these pages, as well as information about military and naval flags, past and present, are always welcome.

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SITE ESTABLISHED LAST UPDATE NEXT UPDATE
7 February 1999

7 February 2019

30 March 2019
WAR FLAGS © 1999-2019 Thomas M. Gregg