Through the Ages & Around the World

 

FIFTEENTH ANNIVERSARY  •  1999-2014

WELCOME TO WAR FLAGS!
 

The links below provide quick access to the main sections of the site and to the index page of HISTORICAL FLAGS OF THE WORLD, a special section devoted to flags that have played a significant role in history. To navigate around the site, simply click on the flag icons. Discover flag-related military history by clicking on the "Parading the Colors" link. Thanks for stopping by—and enjoy your visit!
 

WAR FLAGS SHOWCASE
Uruguay Naval Ensigns & Flags
WAR FLAGS GLOSSARY
Vexillology Spoken Here
WAR FLAGS LINKS
Favorite Flag Sites
 

WAR FLAGS  

ARCHIVE OF THE COLORS
WAR FLAGS Permanent Collection
Parading the Colors SITE UPDATES
New Sections, Pages & Images
 


 

LATEST UPDATE
Flags of African Independence  •  French West & Equatorial Africa

 

FEATURED FLAG
 

CONFEDERATE STATES OF AMERICA

 

CONFEDERATE STATES NAVY  •  ENSIGN OF THE CSS ALABAMA  •  1864
 

The CSS Alabama was built secretly in 1862 by a British shipbuilding firm. Designed as a commerce raider, she displaced 1,050 tons and was 220 feet in length with a beam of 32 feet. Propulsion was provided by sail and a pair of steam engines driving a single screw for ten knots under sail alone and just over thirteen knots under sail and steam. The ship was launched as the Enrica on 15 May 1862 and sailed from Liverpool on 29 July 1862, bound for Terceira Island in the Azores. There she was commissioned in the Confederate States Navy as the screw sloop-of-war Alabama, Captain Raphael Semmes commanding. While at Terceira she was refitted, provisioned and armed with a broadside battery of six 32-pounder smoothbore cannon (three per side), a 7-inch rifled pivot cannon forward of the mainmast and an 8-inch smoothbore pivot cannon aft of the mainmast. Alabama’s 24 officers were American Southerners but most of the initial crew of 83 were British seamen. 

Between 1862 and 1864 Alabama made seven commerce-raiding cruises, capturing and destroying 65 Union ships, including the gunboat USS Hatteras off the Texas coast in 1863. In all that time she never entered a Confederate port. Frequently hunted by the US Navy but never caught, she became famous. But Alabama’s luck ran out in June 1864, when Captain Semmes brought his ship into the French port of Cherbourg for a badly needed refit. On 11 June the screw sloop-of-war USS Kearsarge arrived outside the port, her commander, Captain John A. Winslow, having received word that Alabama was present there. Rather than allow his ship to be bottled up Semmes elected to fight and Alabama sortied from Cherbourg on 19 June. In a hard-fought engagement lasting just over an hour, the Confederate raider was so badly damaged that she was forced to strike her colors. As his ship sank, Captain Semmes and 41 of his crew made their escape, having been picked up by a British yacht that happened to be in the area. He eventually made his way back to the Confederacy via Cuba and in February 1865 was promoted to rear admiral, being given command of the CSN’s James River Squadron. After the fall of Richmond he was forced to burn or scuttle his ships and their crews were drafted into the Confederate Army as the Naval Brigade, Semmes himself commanding them as a brigadier general. The brigade served briefly in North Carolina before surrendering to Major General William T. Sherman.

During her storied career CSS Alabama flew several different versions of the CSA naval ensign. Most depictions of the ship’s final action show her flying the Stainless Banner but the ensign shown above was captured by USS Kearsarge. It appears to be a seven-star variant of the Stars and Bars to which an eighth star was later added.

See also American Naval Flags of the Civil War.
 

 

MISSION ACCOMPLISHED
 

 
GUIDON  •  511th MILITARY POLICE COMPANY
 

The 511th Military Police Company traces its lineage to the 1125th Military Police Company, which was constituted 12 November 1942 in the Army of the United States and activated on 1 January 1943 at Brookley Field, Alabama. After World War II service in the Pacific theater, the company was inactivated on 25 March 1946 in Japan. On  1 November 1970, the 1125th was redesignated  as the 511th Military Police Company, allotted to the Regular Army and activated at Fort Dix, New Jersey. The 511th is currently stationed at Fort Drum, New York, as a unit of the 10th Sustainment Brigade, 10th Mountain Division.

The 511th Military Police Company's campaign credits include Leyte (Philippines—World War II), Panama (1989) and Iraq (2006 and 2008-09). The 511th received the Republic of the Philippines Presidential Unit Citation for its service on Leyte and the Meritorious Unit Commendation for its service in Iraq in 2006.

The 511th's guidon is of the standard pattern for separate TO&E companies, with the Military Police branch insignia over the unit's numerical designation in the Military Police branch colors.

The soldiers of the 511th Military Police Company (including the daughter of the author of this site) deployed to Afghanistan on 11 September 2010 and returned to their home station on September 5, 2011. Their guidon will remain on display here in honor of the 511th's exceptional service during its Afghanistan deployment.

See also US Army Guidons of the Combat Arms.
 


 


 

OUR CUSTOM BUMPER STICKER TELLS THE TROOPS
 THAT YOU HONOR THEIR SERVICE!

GET YOURS TODAY!


 

SUPPORTING THE SOLDIER

 

ORGANIZATIONAL FLAG  •  407th ARMY FIELD SUPPORT BRIGADE  •  US ARMY SUSTAINMENT COMMAND
 

Activated in 2005 and headquartered at Fort Hood, Texas, the 407th AFSB is responsible for the logistical support of Active Army, Army Reserve and Army National Guard units in thirteen states. The 407th controls four support battalions, each of which is aligned with a combat division. The brigade’s peacetime mission is to integrate all logistical functions within its area of responsibility. When deployed, it falls under the operational control of the relevant Theater Sustainment Command, providing a bridge between the force in the field and the Army’s logistical infrastructure. 

The organizational flag of the 407th AFSB is of the standard pattern for support brigades: vertical stripes of buff and scarlet, fringed yellow with the brigade shoulder sleeve insignia centered. The flag is made of heavy rayon banner cloth; dimensions are 3 feet at the hoist by 4 feet on the fly plus 2 12-inch yellow fringe.

 See also US Army Functional Brigades.
 

 

YOUR HOST
 

                         
 

TOM GREGG
 


 

WAR FLAGS features selections from my extensive collection of GIF images. I also invite you to visit Twenty-Six Letters, my blog devoted to politics, current affairs and culture.

I enjoy hearing from people who share my interest in flags of all kinds. Comments and questions about the images on these pages, as well as information about military and naval flags, past and present, are always welcome. And if you're interested in flags, consider joining:
 

THE NORTH AMERICAN VEXILLOGICAL ASSOCIATION

TO VISIT NAVA'S AWARD-WINNING WEBSITE, CLICK ON THE NAVA SEAL.

 

 

ribbons2.gif (7044 bytes)

 

 

SITE ESTABLISHED LAST UPDATE NEXT UPDATE
7 February 1999

29 December 2014

1 February 2015

WAR FLAGS © 1999-2015 Thomas M. Gregg