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THE COMMERCIAL CODE OF SIGNALS  •  1857-1902
 

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KINGDOM OF PRUSSIA

REGIMENTAL STANDARD  •  CUIRASSIER REGIMENT  GARDE DU CORPS •  1814-15

The standard carried by the Prussian Garde du Corps Cuirassier Regiment in the final years of the Napoleonic Wars was similar to the eighteenth-century standard but made in the form of a flag rather than a Roman vexillum. Other differences were the style of the eagle and the orange backing within the wreaths. The cyphers in the corners were FW for King Frederick William III. The motto on the wreath above the eagle was Pro Gloria et Patria (For Glory and Fatherland). The standard, which measured 60cm square plus fringe, was made by hand embroidering the insignia on two sheets of silk damask that were then sewn onto a heavy linen center cloth. Because they were so costly, such cavalry standards were only replaced when lost or worn out, unlike the cheaper infantry colors that were replaced more frequently, for instance when a new king took the Prussian throne.

See also Prussian Cavalry Standards 1740-1808.

MISSION ACCOMPLISHED
GUIDON  •  511th MILITARY POLICE COMPANY

The 511th Military Police Company traces its lineage to the 1125th Military Police Company, which was constituted 12 November 1942 in the Army of the United States and activated on 1 January 1943 at Brookley Field, Alabama. After World War II service in the Pacific theater, the company was inactivated on 25 March 1946 in Japan. On  1 November 1970, the 1125th was redesignated  as the 511th Military Police Company, allotted to the Regular Army and activated at Fort Dix, New Jersey. The 511th is currently stationed at Fort Drum, New York, as a unit of the 10th Sustainment Brigade, 10th Mountain Division.

The 511th Military Police Company's campaign credits include Leyte (Philippines—World War II), Panama (1989) and Iraq (2006 and 2008-09). The 511th received the Republic of the Philippines Presidential Unit Citation for its service on Leyte and the Meritorious Unit Commendation for its service in Iraq in 2006.

The 511th's guidon is of the standard pattern for separate TO&E companies, with the Military Police branch insignia over the unit's numerical designation in the Military Police branch colors.

The soldiers of the 511th Military Police Company (including the daughter of the author of this site) deployed to Afghanistan on 11 September 2010 and returned to their home station on September 5, 2011. Their guidon will remain on display here in honor of the 511th's exceptional service during its Afghanistan deployment.

See also US Army Guidons of the Combat Arms.

"BOOTS AND SADDLES"



DISTINGUISHING FLAG  •  CAVALRY CORPS, ARMY OF THE POTOMAC  •  1864-65

The cavalry of the Army of the Potomac was organized into a single corps by Major General Joseph Hooker in April of 1863 and by the summer of that year it had developed into a formidable force, fully capable of meeting the Confederate cavalry on equal terms. The army's cavalry played a key role in the Gettysburg campaign, Brigadier General John Buford's division delaying the Confederate advance on the first day of the battle. Buford's stand gave the Army of the Potomac time to occupy the vital high ground to the south of the town, which proved to be the key to victory.

The Army of the Potomac's Cavalry Corps consisted of three and later four divisions, each with three brigades. Its first distinguishing flags were based on the prewar cavalry guidon: red over white, but in 1864 these were replaced by new patterns based on that of the army's infantry corps. For the corps as a whole the distinguishing flag was blue, swallowtailed, with the monogram C superimposed on the cavalry branch insignia, crossed sabers. See also Flags & Colors of the Union Army.

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TOM GREGG

WAR FLAGS features selections from my extensive collection of GIF images. I also invite you to visit Twenty-Six Letters, my blog devoted to politics, current affairs and culture. I enjoy hearing from people who share my interest in flags of all kinds. Comments and questions about the images on these pages, as well as information about military and naval flags, past and present, are always welcome.

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7 February 1999

25 July 2017

10 September 2017
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